Best Chinos for Men

There’s a strong case to be made for the chino: It’s a softer, more urbane cousin to khakis. (Technically, chinos don’t show any stitching, and are more of an indoor garment than a pair of khakis. Also, khaki is a color; chino is a style.) Men can wear them without having to get caught up in denim, which tends to breed cultish followings, especially for raw-selvedge jeans. Chinos are more neutral, but still sophisticated — a true day-to-night pant.

That said, there are a lot of them to choose from. Bonobos, itself a notable chinos emporium, has dozens of styles and fits. There’s also an in-house Strat favorite chino from Rag & Bone that’s been posted about before. To expand on that, and find out why some other men like their brand of chinos and the way they fit, we polled a new batch of chino wearers and lovers, and found everything from a cheap uniform staple to a very luxe pair from Milan.

The best chinos for $20

Dickies 874

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Dickies 874

We actually had two enthusiastic votes for the classic Dickies 874 work pants, which Noah Johnson, senior style editor at GQ, calls the “ultimate egalitarian chino.” His favorite Dickies details include the fact that they come in different inseam lengths, meaning you might be able to avoid going to the tailor, and the “subtle sheen” and “flawless factory crease” in a still-new pair. Isaac Hindin-Miller, a fashion writer and DJ, also loves them: “They are the sturdiest pants on the market, they’re stain-resistant, they’re classic and will never go out of style,” he says. “They’re the same pants that I’ve been wearing since I was a teenage skateboarder living in Christchurch, New Zealand. The only differences are that I used to pay $90 per pair from my local skate shop back then in the 1990s, and now I spend less time on a skateboard. My favorite color of Dickies pants is white: They almost never get dirty, and I wear them all year round, Memorial Day be damned.”

$20 at Walmart

Best chinos for under $100

Bonobos Washed Chinos

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Bonobos Washed Chinos

“Most chinos don’t fit me well, particularly over my butt, which is on the bigger side. The ones that do sometimes don’t fit over my thighs. I actually got some Uniqlo chinos that fit well (which is a first), but we’ll see how long they last. I like Bonobos because they fit nicely over my butt and thighs without being too baggy at the ankle, and last longer in the seat than other chinos.” —Calvin Stowell, chief growth officer at The Trevor Project

$88 at Bonobos

Best chinos with some stretch

Lacoste Slim Fit Stretch Chino

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Lacoste Slim Fit Stretch Chino

“I’m obsessed with my Lacoste Slim Fit Stretch Chinos. As someone with bigger legs, but who stylistically prefers a more tapered and tailored look, these chinos hit the mark, thanks to their slim fit and added stretch. In general, I’m a huge Lacoste fan, but up until a few years ago, they hadn’t been one of my closet staples, especially for pants. A friend had told me the brand had really stepped up their game beyond the classic polos, so I checked out what they had going on. That is when I found these must-have chinos.” —Barrett Pall, founder of website Artisan & King

$98 at Lacoste

The best lightweight chinos

Save Khaki United Bulldog Twill Full Taper Chino

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Save Khaki United Bulldog Twill Full Taper Chino

“My favorite pair of chinos are my light-green-with-a-touch-of-olive Save Khaki chinos, which I bought at Stag in Los Angeles. I was looking for a lightweight option to my staple uniform, my jeans. They have a good summery feel when you want to dress up just a little, but still work with sneakers or even sandals. The material is super light and makes you feel very comfortable, whether you’re spending a day in the park or out and about for an evening.” —Erik Ulin, president of men’s fashion, UBM Americas trade shows

$180 at Save Khaki United

The best chinos from Italy

Fortela Pences Trousers

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Fortela Pences Trousers

“I’ve gone through a lot of chinos in my life, but I’ve rarely found a pair I like as much on me as when I saw them on someone else. Then I stumbled upon Fortela, a small shop in Milan that makes its own line of broken-in staples. They’re obsessed about their pants, which are cut in the new Italian style — roomy pleats, narrow leg — but made with Japanese selvedge. It’s there I found a hearty cotton gabardine pair. They can’t stand up without me, but almost.” —Jay Fielden, editor-in-chief, Esquire

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